Resources and Glossary

I’ll use this page to link to useful resources and blog posts from the site that you might find helpful.¬†I expect that I’ll be adding to this page as the semester moves forward. Click on any of the subject headings below to expand the accordion tab.

It’s important that you know the difference. Links are for humans, while URLs are for machines, so use links not URLs when you write!

It’s important that you know the difference¬†between pages and posts.

Different themes handle commenting differently, but many themes allow users to create links and other formatting while leaving comments, but only if they know how to do so manually with HTML code. There’s often no visual editor that lets you use HTML at the push of a button. Here’s a post that explains what you can do in comments on this site.
Because the work you are doing for this class is all academic writing, you need to make certain that you do cite your sources. Some of the guidelines for MLA citation won’t apply perfectly because they are really designed to be used in papers that are printed, but most of the MLA guidelines do apply. This post will help you to fulfill the dual goals of meeting the requirements of MLA citation while also taking advantage of the affordances of publishing for the web.
Over the course of the semester, I’ll ask you to play and write about some classic Atari games. In order to play those games, you’ll need to use an emulator program called Stella. Here’s a post with instructions on using Stella.

Here’s the page in the Domain documentation that covers getting help with your website issues. In much condensed form: start by trying to solve the problem yourself, in consultation with the Domain docs and/or the WordPress codex. If you need more help, then make an appointment at the Writing Center. If the tutor you meet with can’t help with your issue, then the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship is your next stop. If they can’t help you either, they’ll direct you to me. (Since you’re in my class, you will have more opportunities than many to come directly to me, and that’s great. But I really do want you to make a good-faith effort to figure out answers to your own questions before you come to me with them. You’ll learn more by solving your own questions.)